Salmon producer accused of ‘Big Brother corporate snooping’ on campaigner

By Paul Dobson in The Ferret

A leading Scottish salmon producer hired a private investigator to snoop on a key critic of the fish farming industry, The Ferret investigative journalism team can reveal.

Internal industry documents show that a former chief executive of The Scottish Salmon Company (TSSC), requested an ‘intelligence report’ on the fish farming campaigner, Corin Smith, and another unnamed individual in November 2018.

Included in the ‘intelligence report’ are analyses of Smith’s movements and behaviour, monitoring of his social media accounts, and pictures of his house. Searches were conducted of his financial and legal history, as well as for keywords and terms relevant to Smith on the Dark Web.

The Ferret’s revelations have provoked outraged responses from green activists and politicians. One environmental group said that the “Big Brother levels of corporate snooping” employed against Smith by TSSC showed it was unable to “win the argument” on its environmental record “by fair means”.

The report recommends surveillance of Smith and the other individual- whose name is redacted- for 48 hours before and after fish farming events.

It’s rich old men, who don’t live here, using their obscene wealth to bully and intimidate locals to ensure they can continue stripping us of our natural assets and keep for themselves the wealth that should be in our children’s future.

Corin Smith, fish farming campaigner

THE FULL STORY IS ON THE FERRET WEBSITE

One comment

  1. This is stalking of the gravest concern. Monitoring and individual’s movements, keeping their house, is as serious as it gets.

    Were the investigators planning to kill Corin, maybe cause him to have an accident. That is the inevitable conclusion one can draw when this type of behaviour is indulged. You are a target, someone is targeting you, and you are at risk.

    This is the way gangsters, drug dealers, go about business. And look at the results there.

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