Andrew O’Hagan: ‘If you are honest, you never stop being who you were’

In his writing over the years, O’Hagan has painted an affectionate portrait of himself as a young man. He was the boy who stowed books in a bread tin under his bed, hidden from the sneers of his dad, a violent alcoholic; the kid with more interest in “history and flowers” than Celtic FC. Having three older brothers helped him survive. “I mean I was openly expressing interest in Virginia Woolf at school – that was basically asking to be battered. But they were quite tough my brothers, so kids left me alone.”

SYMPTOMS? GET TESTED NOW

Restrictions come into effect at midnight (Tuesday 1 September), initially for 2 weeks. Learn more gov.scot/coronaviruslocal
People living in these areas:
should not meet other households in indoor household settings, whether in these areas or elsewhere
can continue to meet other households outside e.g. in gardens or hospitality
should be extra vigilant and follow all guidance

THOUGHT FOR THE DAY

It is undoubtedly true that this pandemic has introduced into the lives of many people fear and apprehension about the whole situation. On the other hand there are those for whom the whole situation has passed by as little more than an annoyance to their usual habits in life and are determined not to let it affect them in any way. Fear is not on their agenda. Most sensible people, I suspect, would think of this latter group as at times irresponsible if not downright stupid. 

THIS IS AMERICA

President Donald Trump defended Kyle Rittenhouse, the 17-year-old Trump supporter who fatally shot two people in Kenosha, Wisconsin, last week. The president also blamed mounting civil unrest on “left-wing political violence.” Speaking at a White House coronavirus update, Trump called Rittenhouse’s attack at a Black Lives Matter demonstration, held days after Kenosha police wounded Jacob Blake, a Black man, an “interesting situation.” “He was trying to get away from them, I guess … and he fell,” Trump claimed, citing videos of the Rittenhouse attack. “And then they very violently attacked him.”

BRIAN WILSON’S COLUMN

There are good reasons, historic and current, for the differentials of inter-dependence. It is only when statistics become weaponised in a battle of flags – which Scottish politics has been reduced to – that these arguments of fairness are obscured. Personally, I prefer fairness to flags.

THIS IS AMERICA

Since Chinese officials implemented the first coronavirus lockdown in the city of Wuhan in January, there have been more than 25.2 million cases of COVID-19 across the planet. More than 846,000 people have died from the disease, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. Efforts to curb the outbreak have led to the global disruption of daily life and the economy, as schools and workplaces shuttered in hopes of slowing transmission.

Life-saving needle-exchange van receives green light

The van, funded by the Scottish Drug Deaths Taskforce will act as a key touchpoint for people who use drugs to engage with the health service within Glasgow HSCP. Primarily providing injecting equipment to minimise the transfer of blood-borne viruses (BBV) and maximise harm reduction, it will also carry out BBV testing in the community to help tackle the HIV epidemic in Glasgow.

COUNCIL SPENDS, SPENDS, SPENDS ON ENTERTAINMENT WHILE POOR ARE FORCED INTO FOOD AND CLOTHING BANKS

December 2017 saw Clydebank Churches Together songsters clear their throats at the conclusion of a Christmas Carol Concert in the Town Hall. It cost £432.68. Civic Reception for the Clydebank Asbestos Group, Clydebank Town Hall.  Then there was the LGBT Rainbow Flag Raising Event, Garshake Road, Dumbarton.  Reception thereafter in Council Offices.  In March, Provost Hendrie hosted the 10th Clydebank Blitz Memorial Service, Old Dalnottar Cemetery, followed by wreath laying ceremony at Solidarity Plaza.  Reception thereafter in the Reception Hall, Clydebank Town Hall.  It cost       £1,366.00, and a couple of days later, on the 12th, they had a ‘Fly a Flag for the Commonwealth’ Flag Raising Ceremony. I am certain none of you would have dreamed of missing that one.

The Sunday Post flies the flag for investigative journalism

Jim Wilson, editor of The Sunday Post, said: “Our readers have been enjoying the journalism of The Sunday Post for more than 100 years but the traditional strengths of Sunday journalism – the ability to take more time to tell stories with depth – has never felt more important. This campaign is flying the flag for quality, trusted journalism and the need for that journalism has never felt greater.”

THIS IS AMERICA

Employees who helped stage video productions or speeches at the White House may be in violation of the Hatch Act, a federal law prohibiting political activity on government property. “This administration has been committing ethics violations right and left,” said Walter Shaub, a senior adviser to an ethics watchdog group. [

THIS IS AMERICA

Steve Bannon’s fraud indictment linked to fundraising for Donald Trump’s U.S.-Mexico border wall isn’t his only legal headache. The FBI and Securities and Exchange Commission are also investigating a $300 million investment offering for a planned media company tied to Bannon and fugitive Chinese businessman Guo Wengui.

Anyone for gulli-danda?

The cricket matches I grew up with in the Indian subcontinent during the Forties and Fifties lasted five days. The players were dressed in immaculate white or off-white flannels, the ball was dark red and the spectators were well-dressed and sedate. It was no different in the West Indies: English cricket was everywhere the model.

EDINBURGH BOOK FESTIVAL

You’ll even have the opportunity to chat to audience members in the digital chatroom and take part in author Q&A sessions (for selected events only) from 30 minutes before the event starts. To ensure your Festival viewing experience is as pleasant as possible, make sure you are using an up-to-date browser – we recommend Firefox, Chrome, Microsoft Edge or Safari, which are all downloadable for free online.

THIS IS AMERICA TODAY

Joe Biden and California Sen. Kamala Harris appeared together for the first time as a joint Democratic ticket Wednesday in Wilmington, Delaware, with a clear general election message: President Donald Trump is a purveyor of crisis. “America is crying out for leadership, yet we have a president who cares more about himself than the people who elected him,” Harris said after being introduced by Biden. “A president who is making every challenge we face even more difficult to solve.” She also made an emotional tribute to her friend Beau Biden. [

Prosecutors consider Glasgow HSE hospital infection report

A Crown Office spokesman said: “The Crown‎ Office and Procurator Fiscal Service is committed to ensuring that the facts and circumstances surrounding the deaths of a 10-year-old boy and a 73-year-old woman at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in December 2018 and January 2019 respectively are thoroughly investigated by the relevant agencies, fully considered by COPFS and, in due course, aired in an appropriate legal forum.

THIS IS AMERICA

joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, has tapped Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) to be his running mate. Biden described Harris as “a fearless fighter for the little guy, and one of the country’s finest public servants.” Harris, a former attorney general of California and ex-district attorney of San Francisco, is a historic pick for the ticket.

THOUGHT FOR THE DAY

One modern philosopher – Albert Camus – saw in the myth the truth of human existence. He saw us as constantly frustrated by a life that is absurd and without meaning. He rejected despair as the only legitimate response in the face of such adversity and opted instead for courage.

NOTEBOOK by BILL HEANEY

They harbour a few dozen of the elect who wield influence on policy and strategy. Together they form an intellectual and philosophical black hole where radical ideas disappear and die. In exchange for this they get invitations to sup at the Bute House Presidential Palace or get thrown a seat on a quango or a health board. Thus, the triumph of middle-class mediocrity is assured.