HAT’S THE WAY NOT TO DO IT, LORD PROVOST

Glasgow’s ex-lord provost to repay £2,000 of expenses claims

Eva Bolander

Ms Bolander’s claims included £1,150 for 23 pairs of shoes

BBC Scotland is reporting that the former lord provost of Glasgow is to repay a quarter of the £8,000 in expenses that led to her resignation.

SNP councillor Eva Bolander has said she will return £2053.71 of the money she claimed for “personal” items to perform her civic duties.

Her claims included £1,150 for shoes, £665 for coats, £751 for haircuts, £240 on hats and £479 on nail treatments.

The payback figure was released following a Freedom of Information request.

  • Glasgow Lord Provost Eva Bolander resigns after expenses row
  • Lord provost claimed 23 pairs of shoes on expenses

An agreement with the council means she will not have to publish an itemised list of what the repayments are for.

When details of her expense claims first emerged, Ms Bolander committed to repay some of the money.

She eventually resigned in October, saying that while her spending was “within the rules”, she “apologised unreservedly”.

In a letter to councillors, she said she had been “privileged to represent and advocate for Glasgow”.

Public eye

She said that it had “always been recognised” that the provost’s role “carries an additional cost, taking place as it does almost entirely in the public eye”.

Ms Bolander justified the spending, saying that her role “must be open to any elected member of the council”, and that no one be excluded from taking on the job “by not having the resources to carry out the role”.

She added that when submitting claims, she had always considered whether she would require the item were she not lord provost.

“Each has been made in good faith and scrupulously accounted for, within the rules”, she continued.

“Although the spending incurred was within the rules, on reflection there are items which I should not have chosen to reclaim.

“I am sorry about that and I am in discussion with financial services to come to an arrangement to repay the relevant expenditure.”


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